New York Fashion Week: Men’s Fall/Winter 2016 Report

STREET NO MORE. The menswear designers of New York have successfully elevated their offerings beyond the influence of streetwear

 

Daring designer duo Daniel silver and steven Cox of Duckie brown
Daring designer duo Daniel Silver and Steven Cox of Duckie Brown

 

Being a dark horse, an outsider or a newcomer always has its advantages. Just look at how the newly official New York Fashion Week: Men’s has been progressing so far. Now entering its second official season, the premiere fashion event for men of the Big Apple has gradually strayed away from cookie-cutter approaches as designers imbue their designs with bolder, more distinctive signatures. The fall/winter installment in particular raised an
interesting and principal, question: How should one start a collection?

Some brands generally begin with an inspiration board; but the designers of New York apparently took a slightly different road. A few drew on ideas close to their personal experiences; another conceptualized a collection based on their concern for the development of the menswear industry. Thus, New York, once identical to streetwear, elevates itself into a serious, headline-making fashion scene.

Duckie Brown was one of the brands making those headlines. In an age where more is more, and fashion is projected on screens with endless streams of images, the brand only released six looks for their fall/winter runway show. Yes, six—not sixteen nor sixty—simple, strong and rather saccharine getups were on display. Steven Cox and Daniel Silver, the founders and creative directors of the brand, explained: “It is real menswear. We’ve done womenswear for men for so long, and it’s now happening for men in the mainstream, so it was time to go back.” Known for their feminine edge on menswear pieces, it was interesting to see exaggerated shoulders, crisp shirts and straight-cut trousers presented in a proportionately playful manner. All in all, the show felt like a wake-up call for the fashion industry; one that proclaims how substance matters more than ever.

 

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